About This Book

The Creature from Jekyll Island - By G. Edward Griffin

"The Federal Reserve System was modeled very closely after the Bank of England. It was what the textbooks call a "central bank". That's just a code word. It doesn't really mean anything. It's not a bank at all... What it basically is, is a cartel - it's a partnership between the government and the private banks. ...the cartel went into partnership with the federal government - and cartels like to do that because only governments can enforce the cartel agreements." (Interview with author)

"The secret meeting on Jekyll Island in Georgia at which the Federal Reserve was conceived; the birth of a banking cartel to protect its members from competition; the strategy of how to convince Congress and the public that this cartel was an agency of the United States government.--...were seven men who represented an estimated one-fourth of the total wealth of the entire world.

1. Nelson W. Aldrich, Republican "whip" in the Senate, Chairman of the National Monetary Commission, business associate of J.P. Morgan, father-in-law to John D. Rockefeller, Jr.;

2. Abraham Piatt Andrew, Assistant Secretary of the United States Treasury;

3. Frank A. Vanderlip, president of the National City Bank of New York, the most powerful of the banks at that time,representing William Rockefeller and the international investment banking house of Kuhn, Loeb & Company;

4. Henry P. Davison, senior partner of the J.P Morgan Company;

5. Charles D. Norton, president of J.P. Morgan's First National Bank ofNew York;

6. Benjamin Strong, head of J.P. Morgan's Bankers Trust Company;and

7. Paul M. Warburg, a partner in Kuhn, Loeb & Company, a representative of the Rothschild banking dynasty in England and France, and brother to Max Warburg who was head of the Warburg banking consortium in Germany and the Netherlands.

In 1913, the same year that the Federal Reserve Act was passed into law, a subcommittee of the House Committee on Currency and Banking, under the chairmanship of Arsene Pujo of Louisiana, completed its investigation into the concentration of financial power in the United States. Pujo was considered to be a spokesman for the oil interests, part of the very group under investigation, and did everything possible to sabotage the hearings. In spite of his efforts, however, the final report of the committee at large was devastating. It stated:

Your committee is satisfied from the proofs submitted, even in the absence of data from the banks, that there is an established and well defined identity and community of interest between a few leaders of finance...which has resulted in great and rapidly growing concentration of the control of money and credit in the hands of these few men..." (Excerpts from Chapter 1)

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